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Personal and Professional Blog of Rich Hauck

Does Anyone Subscribe to Print?

by: Rich Hauck

I’ve often wondered what kind of freelance designer subscribes to Print Magazine—or any other designer magazine for that matter. Ranging from $12 to $25 an issue, I have to ask myself if I got suckered when I recently purchased Print Magazine and Step Into Design Magazine–or if it was worth it. Okay, so I found some of the content intellectually stimulating, but, alas, paying for ads–I’m submitting to commercialism at its best (or worst!).

These designer magazines usually focus on print design, but almost always touch on product design, architecture, and Web design (along with a few sprinkled rockstar designer interviews and catchy stock photo ads). While I acknowledge that design spans different mediums, I’d prefer the articles be on interactive design (something that doesn’t always get the cover). It seems like a magazine based around this model never works, as interactive design is usually devoted to an annual; anyone attempting to create anything even remotely resembling a Web-only design magazine ends up declaring bankruptcy two issues in–worse yet, if they don’t declare bankruptcy, they play the let’s-convert-our-publication-to-a-Web-only concept. Suddenly the lack of researched articles becomes evident, the lack-of-budget shows, and the site loses what popularity it had. Hmm, I wonder if I just uncovered the designer magazines’ need for such high cover prices…


Categories:webdesign
Comments: 3

Fine, Fine Dining

by: Rich Hauck

If you know me well enough, then you know that I tend to foolishly squander money on going out to eat. I’m told it runs in the family, but who knows, maybe I think Milton Glaser was onto something by being both a graphic designer and a food critic.

Someday I plan on heading south to Philly’s Le Bec-Fin, but perhaps I’ve found something better in my own backyard; running through Zagat’s 2005 NYC Restaurant Map I discovered Per Se, Thomas Keller’s restaurant at the Time Warner Center.

Per Se requires a reservation two months in advance, but it scores an astronomical 29/30 on food, décor and service with Zagat. What has me wondering more than whether it lives up to the hype, though (Nobu was really good, yet over-hyped), is that once I walk out of the dining room, will I feel that my $210 per-person meal was worth it?


Categories:NYC
Comments: 0

Breathsavers Screensaver

by: Rich Hauck

Breathsavers Screensaver
I was recently contracted to create a new screensaver for Breathsavers along with a number of site updates. The screensaver is now live on the Breathsavers site, and if anyone’s wondering what the code looks like it can be found on my ITP site (Wave Pattern). Granted, performance-wise, Flash definitely isn’t Java, but I think it’s a cool effect nonetheless.


Categories:webdesign
Comments: 0

What’s the Right Word for Truth?

by: Rich Hauck

Being in a class with Doug Rushkoff makes it no surprise that I’ve seen his PBS series, The Persuaders (It’s streaming free off the Persuaders site, I recommend checking it out). In last week’s class we analyzed the work of Frank Luntz within the context of his interview. “What is the difference? It is climate change. Some people call it global warming; some people call it climate change. What is the difference?” Luntz asks in his interview. The difference, Frank, is that climate change tells us less information—it could be cold or warm, and is therefore an inaccurate lingual representation of what we really need to understand the growing problem.


Categories:General ITP
Comments: 1

The Corporation

by: Rich Hauck

Check out The Corporation, a documentary that presents big business’s impact with society. Granted, I’m not a huge Michael Moore supporter (did they have to end it with him?), and I don’t agree at their finger wagging towards IBM’s involvement with the Holocaust (the film points out that IBM hardware was leased to the Nazis to assist in accounting for Jews—it falls under the old “guns don’t kill people” argument), but it’s quite an eye-opener, otherwise.

What’s particularly interesting to me is that I once wrote about my belief that corporations should endorse culture and the arts as if it were their responsibility to make society a better place for both their employees and their customers. After all, our purchases practically vote these corporations into some higher office; shouldn’t they give us just a little more back? My views changed upon hearing Nobel Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman talk about this very subject in the film. Friedman points out that these corporations are structured to return on their stockholders’ investments, not on saving the trees or helping the poor. Do we really want a corporate entity that’s built for making money or excelling in some particular business to tackle these problems? Shouldn’t saving the world be left to the legitimate foundations? Hmmm…


Categories:General
Comments: 1

Mud Coffee and On Exploring the Town

by: Rich Hauck

Mud CoffeeOne of the things I love about New York is the opportunity to discover new things simply by taking a walk. Sometimes, when the weight of the school week is past me, I will navigate an unfamiliar course home. This time, I went to check out Mud after seeing one of their gourmet coffee-dispensing trucks positioned at Astor Place. Called the “Joe of the East Village” by a friend, I found the coffee to be, well, liquid crack. It’s good, and only finals will tell, but in the meanwhile I’ll stick with Joe (Joe: The Art of Coffee, 141 Waverly Place).

De Robertis
My little adventure took me to De Robertis (I’m a sucker for the old “founded way before you were born” sign), a pastry shop nearby the original Coyote Ugly, for my ritual of cannoli taste-testing. Overall, pretty good, though the pictures on the wall made me wonder if this was really the shop that Tom Cruise stopped at during his night out in Kubrick’s Eyes Wide Shut. Alas, IMDB trivia doesn’t reveal the truth.


Categories:NYC
Comments: 1

What is a NOMA?

by: Rich Hauck

It’s always refreshing to take a stroll through downtown Harrisburg when I come back on the weekends. While I like the occasional martini, I never cared much for the upscale atmosphere of the downtown bar NOMA (though it’s not their fault that I find that most bartenders improperly overpower martinis). Seeing NOMA converted into a wannabe beach bar this past summer, though, proved to me what a poor business model the place had. It’s like those vacant spots that have been inhabited by multiple restaurants over the course of a few years; it’s a red flag that something’s wrong. Well, fortunately, the nicer-looking NOMA has returned as “NOMA:Remixed.” I guess the beach scene just didn’t work out, but at least they could have named it something nicer. While I know that NOMA was really named for North-Of-MArket [Street], according to Merriam-Webster a noma is “a spreading invasive gangrene chiefly of the lining of the cheek and lips that is usually fatal and occurs most often in persons severely debilitated by disease or profound nutritional deficiency.” Nice.


Categories:Harrisburg
Comments: 1

Pulled Over in Harrisburg

by: Rich Hauck

So, I was pulled over for speeding on Colonial Road last night. Maybe I should blame it on the fact that I don’t get to drive my car that often (since I leave it in Mechanicsburg), or perhaps I should just be grateful that I’m not on a NYC subway this weekend with all of the terror threats going around. Regardless, I was shocked to only get a written warning—not a citation. I later found out that a friend of mine got the same treatment on the same road. The irony to all of this, though, is that I’m actually more inspired by a warning to not drive as fast, as if I’m fulfilling some karmic duty. In the end, the experience makes me wonder if this is some reverse psychology technique created by the police. I don’t want to credit them for being so cunning, but with all of the persuasion I’m studying these days it would be pretty interesting to hear about the police force trying a different approach (and saving me money in the process).


Categories:Harrisburg
Comments: 2

Web Developer Extension for Firefox 1.5

by: Rich Hauck

I find myself using Firefox more often now with the release of version 1.5. In the past, Safari was faster (IE isn’t even a consideration) and both rendered CSS fairly effectively. While I’m not happy that Firefox has decided to endorse Apple’s <canvas> tag prior to W3C approval into the XHTML spec, extensions make Firefox leagues ahead in terms of surfing. The incredible Web developer extension by Chris Pedrick is now available for Firefox 1.5. This is worth installing even if you only dabble with XHTML. Now I’m just hoping the get the bookmark synchronizer back…


Categories:webdesign
Comments: 1

About Rich Hauck

Rich Hauck

I'm a creative technologist at Hauck Interactive, Inc. and an adjunct instructor at HACC. I live in Harrisburg, Pa. with my wife and three boys. I enjoy good coffee, Trappist beers, Orioles baseball, and good design.


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